Awesome Disabled Characters In Movies/TV?

offbeatorbit:

offbeatorbit:

Hey everyone! I’m doing a roundup for Gurl.com of cool disable characters in movies/TV shows and I wanted to pick your brains for some suggestions. I just want to make sure that we’re being as representative as possible for different bodies/marginalized folks on the site, so any and all help would be rad <3

Thanks in advance!

Reblogging for the late afternoon crowd!

(via disabilityfashionproject)

The last day of the 107 days campaign. One year ago today the young man pictured, LB, short for &#8220;Laughing Boy&#8221;, drowned in a bath while at an NHS assessment and treatment centre.

He had epilepsy and should never have been left alone there. There is a report into his preventable death here http://www.southernhealth.nhs.uk/news/report-into-death-sparrowhawk/

You can read more about the campaign here http://107daysofaction.wordpress.com/2014/07/04/day-107-honouring-lb-107days/

The last day of the 107 days campaign. One year ago today the young man pictured, LB, short for “Laughing Boy”, drowned in a bath while at an NHS assessment and treatment centre.

He had epilepsy and should never have been left alone there. There is a report into his preventable death here http://www.southernhealth.nhs.uk/news/report-into-death-sparrowhawk/

You can read more about the campaign here http://107daysofaction.wordpress.com/2014/07/04/day-107-honouring-lb-107days/

Big congrats to Robert and Nathan from Glasgow. They were refused access to a bar in Glasgow because of disability. 
THEY TOOK THE CASE TO COURT AND WON
From the original tweets:
Robert: &#8220;Removed from the Polo Lounge, Glasgow tonight by POLICE because I am disabled. #outragedNathan: &#8220;Denied entry to Polo Lounge BECAUSE we are disabled. They sent two police vans to remove us. Their bouncer carried me out and left Robert crawling around the floor. Gutted.
 
Posted by Robert after winning the case from on facebook group:

"This was never about us. We didn&#8217;t do this for us. What happened that night has already had it&#8217;s impact on us and nothing can change that. We took this case in the hope that it would give people faith that discrimination law can work, that as disabled people we don&#8217;t just have to accept the treatment we receive. We took this case for that young LGBT disabled person whose first experience of trying to access their so called community is to be told that they&#8217;re not wanted. We took this case to show every company who thinks it can get away with treating disabled people like they are unworthy of using their services that they can&#8217;t. And today, a year after we tried to go for a celebratory drink in the Polo Lounge and were told we couldn&#8217;t go in, Glasgow Sheriff Court ruled that we were unlawfully discriminated against - we have won our case. We hope the fear of being litigated against and having to pay compensation will encourage other companies to be more proactive in providing for all their customers, including the disabled ones. Nathan and I know this won&#8217;t be the last time we&#8217;ll face discrimination. But for today, we won. We are so incredibly grateful to the unwavering support that everyone has given us. Without the Faculty of Advocates&#8217; Free Legal Assistance Unit, and our amazing lawyer Russell Bradley, we couldn&#8217;t have done this. Tom French, who was with us that night has stood by us all the way through and was an amazing witness. Rachel Amey was there in court to support us, help maintain our sanity, and even brought a pack of straws so I could have a drink! And Nic brought Brownies! Our heartfelt thanks to everyone who has been there for us this year.&#8221;

Big congrats to Robert and Nathan from Glasgow. They were refused access to a bar in Glasgow because of disability. 

THEY TOOK THE CASE TO COURT AND WON

From the original tweets:


Robert: “Removed from the Polo Lounge, Glasgow tonight by POLICE because I am disabled. #outraged

Nathan: “Denied entry to Polo Lounge BECAUSE we are disabled. They sent two police vans to remove us. Their bouncer carried me out and left Robert crawling around the floor. Gutted.

Posted by Robert after winning the case from on facebook group:

"This was never about us. We didn’t do this for us. What happened that night has already had it’s impact on us and nothing can change that. We took this case in the hope that it would give people faith that discrimination law can work, that as disabled people we don’t just have to accept the treatment we receive. We took this case for that young LGBT disabled person whose first experience of trying to access their so called community is to be told that they’re not wanted. We took this case to show every company who thinks it can get away with treating disabled people like they are unworthy of using their services that they can’t. And today, a year after we tried to go for a celebratory drink in the Polo Lounge and were told we couldn’t go in, Glasgow Sheriff Court ruled that we were unlawfully discriminated against - we have won our case. We hope the fear of being litigated against and having to pay compensation will encourage other companies to be more proactive in providing for all their customers, including the disabled ones. Nathan and I know this won’t be the last time we’ll face discrimination. But for today, we won. 

We are so incredibly grateful to the unwavering support that everyone has given us. Without the Faculty of Advocates’ Free Legal Assistance Unit, and our amazing lawyer Russell Bradley, we couldn’t have done this. Tom French, who was with us that night has stood by us all the way through and was an amazing witness. Rachel Amey was there in court to support us, help maintain our sanity, and even brought a pack of straws so I could have a drink! And Nic brought Brownies! Our heartfelt thanks to everyone who has been there for us this year.”

brownnipplebraggadocio:

prettysickart:

emmisnotshortforemma:

Every day… 

I have to share the awesome app I use to negate this issue!
it’s called Medisafe and it’s a free app available in the app store or on google play and it allows you to input all your medications and:
-choose the shape, color, and dosage of each medication (including indicating if it’s an injection or a pill or an inhaler)-notate the dosage and/or # of pills-each time of day/night it needs to be taken-add food or other special instructions-schedule refill reminders-add a med-friend (someone who will be notified if you forget to take it!)
The interface is great and i’ve found it very easy to use.  You can also add meds to take “as needed” so you can indicate that you’ve taken an out-of-time painkiller or booster pill etc.
When it’s time to take your pills it uses the text-notifcation noise on your phone to alert you- so it’s lowkey, but (usually) unmissable.  When it’s time, you have the option to snooze, dismiss, or take pills.  OR you can just shake your phone to indicate that you’ve taken them (I usually either snooze or shake the phone).
It tracks your progress too and you can export yourself an excel spreadsheet of your pill taking to give your physician etc if needed.
You can set the snooze time manually, the maximum number of alarms, all kinds of things- you can set your own alert sound too if you don’t want it to use your text-notification.
I am TERRRRRRRIBLE about remembering pills (seriously, I forgot for 3 weeks).  I haven’t missed a dose since I started using it and it’s fantastic.

Ooh

brownnipplebraggadocio:

prettysickart:

emmisnotshortforemma:

Every day… 

I have to share the awesome app I use to negate this issue!

it’s called Medisafe and it’s a free app available in the app store or on google play and it allows you to input all your medications and:

-choose the shape, color, and dosage of each medication (including indicating if it’s an injection or a pill or an inhaler)
-notate the dosage and/or # of pills
-each time of day/night it needs to be taken
-add food or other special instructions
-schedule refill reminders
-add a med-friend (someone who will be notified if you forget to take it!)

The interface is great and i’ve found it very easy to use.  You can also add meds to take “as needed” so you can indicate that you’ve taken an out-of-time painkiller or booster pill etc.

When it’s time to take your pills it uses the text-notifcation noise on your phone to alert you- so it’s lowkey, but (usually) unmissable.  When it’s time, you have the option to snooze, dismiss, or take pills.  OR you can just shake your phone to indicate that you’ve taken them (I usually either snooze or shake the phone).

It tracks your progress too and you can export yourself an excel spreadsheet of your pill taking to give your physician etc if needed.

You can set the snooze time manually, the maximum number of alarms, all kinds of things- you can set your own alert sound too if you don’t want it to use your text-notification.

I am TERRRRRRRIBLE about remembering pills (seriously, I forgot for 3 weeks).  I haven’t missed a dose since I started using it and it’s fantastic.

Ooh

(via spoonie-living)

thefaultinourspoons:

'Inspirational porn' is offensive to people with disabilities. We are not making excuses. 

Not everyone is capable of becoming a doctor.
Not everyone is capable of becoming a teacher.
Not everyone is capable of being the Prime Minister or the President. 
Not everyone wants to collect money for charity.

All disabled people are different, there are so many different things that make people disabled. Just because someone who is disabled doesn’t become an Olympic athlete it doesn’t mean they are giving in to their disability. 

We are not defined by our disabilities. Being disabled isn’t a bad thing. Yes people who are in car accidents can learn to walk again, but that doesn’t mean that every disabled person can learn to walk again, mainly because not every disabled person can’t walk. 

But for those with chronic illnesses walking is painful, it’s dangerous, some of us would end up collapsing if we walk to far, walking makes us extremely fatigued, walking can make us sicker.

Inspiration porn is when disabled people are called inspirational or brave for doing all the things that regular people do.  It’s a problem because it assumes that anyone with a disability must have it so much worse than the rest of us.  And because it uses disabled people to make us non disabled people feel good about ourselves, or to make us do something, like exercise or whatever.  And disabled people aren’t tools, they’re people.

'The only disability in life is a bad attitude', no, the only disability in life is people who don't want to adjust the word to help those with disabilities, but want to adjust those with disabilities to the world.

(via trabasack)

Ten Things Not to Say to a Person with Schizophrenia

Guest reblog from http://schizophreniasucks.blogspot.co.uk/2014/05/ten-things-not-to-say-to-person-with.html?m=1 Please visit and comment on the original :-)

I’ve seen a few of these types of blog post around, for various mental health problems, so I thought I’d do one for schizophrenia. These are ten things I’ve heard from people that, although sometimes said to try and help, have been extremely unhelpful.

1. That’s the one with multiple personalities, isn’t it?

I’ve heard this one twice I think, in hospital from other patients. Schizophrenia is NOT multiple personalities, despite the common myth. Multiple personalities is the disorder now known as Dissociative Identity Disorder, previously known as Multiple Personality Disorder. The myth stemmed from the translation of the word schizophrenia, which translates from Greek to mean ‘split mind’. This doesn’t mean that the mind is split into different personalities, it means that a mind is split from reality.

2. Have you ever been violent towards anyone because of your illness?

I’ve heard this one a few times and the answer is still no. Violence with schizophrenia is the exception rather than the rule, despite all the stories of schizophrenia and extreme violence in the news. Let me put it this way. About 1% of the population suffers with schizophrenia, which would mean that as there’s approximately 63 million people in the UK, there are around 630,000 sufferers. If we were all violent, or even if the majority of us were violent, do you not think that stories would be on the news more often? So don’t ask this question. Odds are, the answer is no.

3. Have you tried not listening to the voices?

This one is something that has been said in the nicest possible way but is still highly irritating to hear. If voices were as simple as just not listening to them, don’t you think I would have done it? Voices aren’t like people. You can’t walk away from voices, they follow you wherever you go. You can use music or television to try and drown them out but I’ve had voices that decided to get louder when I turned my music on. I do everything I can to try and drown out voices, but I can’t just not listen to them. It’s not that simple. By the way, this point only applies to those who actually hear voices, as not all people with schizophrenia hear voices.

4. Just take the meds, then you’ll be OK.

This one makes me want to tear my hair out. Some people seem to think that treating schizophrenia is as black and white as the meds will automatically help all people with the illness and they’ll be OK forever providing they just take them. Wrong. The usual type of medication for schizophrenia is the antipsychotic. I’ve been on nine different antipsychotics so far, of which seven have been used in the longer term. Of those seven, three had unbearable side effects and didn’t work, two had bearable side effects but didn’t work, one seemed to work but had side effects that both myself and the doctors were concerned about and the seventh one, the one I’m currently on, I’m still in the early stages of taking. I don’t know yet whether it’s going to work and although so far the side effects are bearable, I’m only on a low dose.

Medication with schizophrenia, as with many other mental illnesses, is trial and error. Overall, I’ve taken fourteen different psychotropic medications for various reasons, and so far, only four have helped. None of them ‘cured’ me, they just took away part of what I was going through. Schizophrenia is not as simple as just taking medication, and many people have actually been cured without using medication. The treatment for schizophrenia should be as unique as the person themselves.

5. Why did you come off medication?

This question is usually accompanied by a look that says, “Are you stupid?” Like I said in the previous point, schizophrenia treatment is not as black and white as taking medication and being miraculously cured. The reason I’ve had for coming off medication was because of the side effects. Some side effects truly are unbearable and no person would want to suffer them. I wrote about this in more detail here.

6. How can you believe something so stupid?

I’ve had this one a few times, once from a psychiatric nurse. Delusions are another common symptom of schizophrenia and to most people, the deluded belief may sound extremely farfetched. To you, it may be clear as day that the CIA is not tracking Joe Bloggs but to Joe, he is terrified that his every move is being watched by the CIA. Telling Joe that his belief is stupid is not going to help and it will just make him think that you’re not going to help him. Instead, just provide a place for Joe to talk about his beliefs if that’s what he wants. Don’t push him into talking about his beliefs though, as this can upset a person even more. Again, this point only applies to those who suffer with delusions as not all people with schizophrenia have delusions.

7. Why won’t you talk about [insert symptom]?

This one has been said to me both in annoyance and in kindness. The answer is always going to be the same: “Because I don’t want to.” I’ve always hated talking about things the voices said to me. Once when I was in hospital, a nurse asked me what one of my voices thought of her. Immediately, the voice told me what he thought of her, something that I will never, ever repeat. She could tell by my face that the voice had told me something, and she tried a few times to get me to tell her what he’d said. She only let the issue go when I burst into tears and begged her not to make me tell her. I HATE talking about things the voices say. Sometimes I hear commands telling me to harm other people, things that make me feel ashamed to hear. I definitely don’t want to talk about stuff like this so please don’t make me. You WILL upset me.

8. You just need to get out more/get more exercise.

If I had a pound for every time I’d heard one of these, well, I’d have very heavy pockets. I KNOW that it’s not good to sit in the house all day everyday and not go out. I KNOW that everyone needs exercise. Please stop telling me. Forcing me to leave the house when I feel anxious is only going to make me feel worse. I’ll get out when I feel ready to leave the house, not before. And as for exercise, it’s not a cure-all. For some reason, anything more than a brisk walk provokes strong suicidal thoughts in me. I used to go to a gym a few times a week and every time I came out, I’d feel absolutely awful. I would usually self-harm as a result of the thoughts I had and a few times I made plans to end my life because of the thoughts. I’ve no idea why this happens to me, but it’s something that’s out of my control. And don’t just tell me to take a brisk walk. Like I say, if I don’t feel up to doing something, forcing me to do it will make me feel worse. I do things when I feel ready to do them.

9. Can’t you see that you’re unwell?

I’ve had a few variables of this one, the most annoying being “But you’re intelligent! Surely you can see that you’re not well!” If I could have seen that I wasn’t well, I would have said so. Schizophrenia has a nasty habit of preventing a person from realising that they’re unwell. Around 30 to 50% of people with schizophrenia fail to realise that they are unwell and trying to force them to see it will often upset or anger them. Don’t try and force a person to see that they’re unwell, let them reach their own conclusions in their own time.

10. You can’t be schizophrenic, you look so normal!

Again, this one has a blanket response from me: “What’s normal?” You can’t always tell if a person has a mental illness just by looking at them. These sort of comments always had a negative impact on me as it invoked one of two feelings. One feeling I got was making me feel like I was wasting NHS resources because if I looked OK, then I must have been OK. The other feeling I got was making me believe that I wasn’t unwell. Like I said in the previous point, not everyone with schizophrenia realises they’re unwell. I am one such person. Telling me I look normal when I’m unwell and not realising it is a surefire way of making me believe even more that I’m fine. So less of the, “You look so normal!” It’s not always a compliment!

So that’s ten things not to say to a person with schizophrenia. If you want to help, just let a person know that you’re there for them and that they can talk if they want. But never force a person to talk when they don’t want to. More ways to help people can be found at this blog post here.

Reblogged with permission from

http://schizophreniasucks.blogspot.co.uk/2014/05/ten-things-not-to-say-to-person-with.html?m=1

thesylverlining:

Please, please share this like wildfire.

My classmate, Susan Hess-Logeais, recently told me about the documentary she’s making called “Soar,” about two amazing young dancers, Kiera and Uriah. It’s incredible, and the young ladies featured in this are astounding, talented, dedicated and extremely important individuals.

Once I heard, I had to share it here. It’s the kind of thing that actually gets attention on tumblr when everybody else ignores it - ignores excellence in black girls, ignores disabled people, and lets them fall by the wayside. So I’m asking, please, please help these girls out, and if not, please reblog and share.

From the “Soar” press release:

"If you’ve ever seen Portland sisters Kiera Brinkley and Uriah Boyd dance together, you know they share a bond that goes beyond sisterhood. 18 year-old Uriah grew up helping Kiera, age 20, adapt after a childhood illness resulted in the amputation of Kiera’s hands and legs just one month after Uriah was born.

“You really have to see them to believe it,” says filmmaker and dancer Susan Hess Logeais. “Kiera can move in ways that are incredibly powerful and graceful, and Uriah is an expressive and talented dancer on her own. But when you see the two of them dance together, you see everything: the struggle, the bond, the joy, the frustration, the mutual love. It’s truly overpowering to watch, and audiences respond pretty intensely.

Hess Logeais is currently fundraising to help pay for the event and finish her film, which she hopes will be eye-opening and inspiring. “We want to change people’s ideas about what is possible,” she says. “For all of us, but especially for the millions of people living with alternate abilities, Kiera shows us what happens when you challenge your limitations. That’s a message I would love to share with as many people as possible.” To find out more about “Soar,” the film, and see some powerful footage of the sisters’ dance, visit the Soar Seed and Spark campaign. Kiera, Uriah and Susan are hoping that the disabled community will join the “Soar” community and support their efforts.”

"Soar" has a crowdfunding project going, but it’s having trouble reaching its goal - and this is just too important to let slip. Please help. Signal boost, share, donate if you can, but DO NOT let Kiera and Uriah be forgotten.

THE IMPORTANT LINKS:

The Website:
http://soardocumentary.com/

Crowdfunding (PLEASE donate):
http://www.seedandspark.com/studio/soar

YouTube: (watch these amazing dancers)
https://www.youtube.com/user/hotflashfilmspdx

Vimeo:
https://vimeo.com/hotflashfilmspdx/videos

THANK YOU so much for reading, and THANK YOU for sharing. This is big, and important, and something good that needs to happen. Thank you.

(via thesylverlining)